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Why Are Mortgage Rates Increasing?

by Ashlie DuCros

According to Freddie Mac’s latest Primary Mortgage Market Survey, the 30-year fixed rate mortgage interest rate jumped up to 3.94% last week. Interest rates had been hovering around 3.5% since June, and many are wondering why there has been such a significant increase so quickly. 

WHY DID RATES GO UP?
Whenever there is a presidential election, there is uncertainty in the markets as to who will win. One way that this is noticeable is through the actions of investors. As the election was drawing nearer, many investors pulled their funds from the more volatile and less predictive stock market and instead, chose to invest in Treasury Bonds.

When this happens, the interest rate on Treasury Bonds does not have to be as high to entice investors to buy them, so interest rates go down. Once the elections are over and a President has been elected, investors return to the stock market and other investments, leaving the Treasury to raise rates to make bonds more attractive again.

Simply put, the better the economy, the higher interest rates will go.

THE GOOD NEWS
Even though rates are closer to 4% than they have been in nearly 6 months, they are still slightly below where we started 2016, at 3.97%.

The great news is that even at 4%, rates are still significantly lower than they have been over the last 4 decades, as you can see in the chart below.

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages with mortgage rates for the week ending Nov. 17:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.94 percent, with an average 0.5 point, rising from last week’s 3.57 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 3.97 percent.

  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.14 percent, with an average 0.5 point, increasing from last week’s 2.88 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 3.18 percent.

  • 5-year hybrid adjustable-rate mortgages: averaged 3.07 percent, with an average 0.4 point, rising from last week’s 2.88 percent average. A year ago, 5-year ARMs averaged 2.98 percent.



BOTTOM LINE
Interest rates are impacted by many factors, and even though they have increased recently, rates would have to reach 9.1% for renting to be cheaper than buying. 

If you are ready to purchase a home of your own, now is a great time to jump in. Contact me to get started on owning your dream home!


 

Mortgage Rates Recede to Near-Record Lows

by Ashlie DuCros

Fixed-rate mortgages dropped this week, basically erasing last week’s spike. Thirty-year rates dipped below 3.5, its summertime average, offering even lower borrowing costs to would-be home buyers and refinancers.

"Mortgage rates continue to be relatively stable and at near record lows,” says Sean Becketti, Freddie Mac’s chief economist. “The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage fell 5 basis points week-over-week to 3.47 percent, erasing last week's increase. At the same time, the 10-year Treasury yield ended the week relatively flat -- up about 2 basis points."

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages with mortgage rates for the week ending Oct. 27:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.47 percent, with an average 0.6 point, dropping 5 basis points from 3.52 percent last week. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 3.76 percent.

  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 2.78 percent, with an average 0.5 point, dropping slightly from last week’s 2.79 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 2.98 percent.

  • 5-year hybrid adjustable-rate mortgages: averaged 2.84 percent, with an average 0.4 point, falling from last week’s 2.85 percent average. A year ago, 5-year ARMs averaged 2.89 percent.

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Even a small increase in interest rates can impact your family’s wealth. Call me to evaluate your ability to purchase your dream home.​

 

Source: Freddie Mac

Mortage applications drop as rates edge higher...

by Ashlie DuCros

Mortgage Applications Drop as Rates Edge Higher

For the second consecutive week, mortgage applications fell as higher interest rates continued to put the squeeze on refinancing activity, the Mortgage Bankers Association reported Wednesday. 

The MBA’s index on mortgage application activity, which includes both refinancing and home purchases, dropped 4.6 percent for the week ending Aug. 16. 

The refinance index was attributed to that drop, falling 7.7 percent last week from the previous week -- its largest weekly drop since late June. The refinance index has fallen 62.1 percent since reaching its peak during the week ending May 3. 

Applications dropped as mortgage rates rose 12 basis points to 4.68 percent last week. That matches the year’s high for 30-year mortgage rates, which was first hit in July, according to the MBA. Mortgage rates continue to rise as concerns mount over the Fed tapering its bond-buying program, which had been keeping mortgage rates near its historical lows in recent months. 

However, mortgage rates still remain low by historical standards and are still attracting home buyers. The MBA’s index showed that loan demand for home purchases, viewed as a gauge for future home sales, rose 1.2 percent last week. That climb comes after a 5.4 percent drop the previous week, the MBA reports. 

Source: “U.S. Mortgage Applications Fall as Rates Push Higher,” Reuters (Aug. 21, 2013

A New Housing Boom

by Ashlie DuCros

 

NEW YORK (CNNMoney) -- The long-battered housing market is finally starting to get back on its feet. But some experts believe it could soon become another housing boom.

Signs of recovery have been evident in the recent pick ups in home prices, home sales and construction. Foreclosures are also down and the Federal Reserve has acted to push mortgage rates near record lows. 

But while many economists believe this emerging housing recovery will produce only slow and modest improvement in home prices, construction and jobs, others believe the rebound will be much stronger.

Barclays Capital put out a report recently forecasting that home prices, which fell by more than a third after the housing bubble burst in 2007, could be back to peak levels as soon as 2015.

"In our view, the housing market had undergone a dramatic over-correction during the prior five years, resulting in pent-up demand for housing purchases that would spark a rapid rise in housing starts," said Stephen Kim, an analyst with Barclays, in a note to clients.

In addition to what Kim sees as a big rebound in building, he's bullish on home prices, expecting rises of 5% to 7.5% a year.

Related: Where housing is most (and least) affordable

Construction is expected to be even stronger, with numerous experts forecasting home construction to grow by at least 20% a year for each of the next two years. Some believe building could be back near the pre-bubble average of about 1.5 million new homes a year by 2016, about double the 750,000 homes expected this year.

"We think the recovery is for real this time around," said Rick Palacios, senior analyst with John Burns Real Estate Consulting. "If you look across the U.S. economy right now, there are only a handful of industries looking at 20-30% growth over the next 4-5 years, and housing is one of those."

Home builder stocks are up 162% in the last 12 months, led by a 250% jump at PulteGroup (PHM). Other leading builders including DR Horton (DHI), Toll Brothers (TOL), KB Home (KBH) and Lennar (LEN) have all seen their stocks more than double over that time. New orders at publicly-traded builders are up 30% since January, according to Kim.

Related: Is buying rental property now a sure bet?

Palacios said stocks in other sectors, from manufacturers of drywall to flooring to kitchen and bath fixtures, have all more than doubled as well this year.

The housing rebound can have a ripple effect that could help get the entire economy growing at a much stronger pace, which will add to more demand for housing.

 But while many economists believe this emerging housing recovery will produce only slow and modest improvement in home prices, construction and jobs, others believe the rebound will be much stronger.

Barclays Capital put out a report recently forecasting that home prices, which fell by more than a third after the housing bubble burst in 2007, could be back to peak levels as soon as 2015.

"In our view, the housing market had undergone a dramatic over-correction during the prior five years, resulting in pent-up demand for housing purchases that would spark a rapid rise in housing starts," said Stephen Kim, an analyst with Barclays, in a note to clients.

In addition to what Kim sees as a big rebound in building, he's bullish on home prices, expecting rises of 5% to 7.5% a year.

Related: Where housing is most (and least) affordable

Construction is expected to be even stronger, with numerous experts forecasting home construction to grow by at least 20% a year for each of the next two years. Some believe building could be back near the pre-bubble average of about 1.5 million new homes a year by 2016, about double the 750,000 homes expected this year.

"We think the recovery is for real this time around," said Rick Palacios, senior analyst with John Burns Real Estate Consulting. "If you look across the U.S. economy right now, there are only a handful of industries looking at 20-30% growth over the next 4-5 years, and housing is one of those."

Home builder stocks are up 162% in the last 12 months, led by a 250% jump at PulteGroup (PHM). Other leading builders including DR Horton (DHI), Toll Brothers (TOL), KB Home (KBH) and Lennar (LEN) have all seen their stocks more than double over that time. New orders at publicly-traded builders are up 30% since January, according to Kim.

Related: Is buying rental property now a sure bet?

Palacios said stocks in other sectors, from manufacturers of drywall to flooring to kitchen and bath fixtures, have all more than doubled as well this year.

The housing rebound can have a ripple effect that could help get the entire economy growing at a much stronger pace, which will add to more demand for housing.

"That turn in the [housing] market is occurring now and it should become a boom by 2015. It will be powerful enough ... to lift the entire U.S. economy," said Roger Altman, chairman of Evercore Partners and former deputy Treasury secretary, in a column for the Financial Times.

Altman said he expects housing will add 4 million jobs to the economy over the next five years, as pent-up demand for home purchases drives building and and home prices higher.

By Chris Isidore @CNNMoney

 

For more information, please contact Ashlie DuCros at 714-743-9778, or go to www.AshlieDuCros.com



 

 

Cost of a Home: Impact of Interest Rates

by Ashlie DuCros

 

by The KCM Crew on October 2, 2012

The buyer should always look at the COST of a home, not just the PRICE. The cost is determined by the price and the mortgage interest rate which is available at the time. Below is a list of the interest rates over the last ten years and the impact they have on a $100,000 mortgage payment.

For more information, please contact Ashlie DuCros at 714-743-9778, or go to www.AshlieDuCros.com

 

U.S. mortgage rates declined to record lows as the Federal Reserve pushed down borrowing costs by resuming purchases of mortgage-backed securities.

The average rate for a 30-year fixed loan fell to 3.4% in the week ended today from 3.49%, McLean, Virginia-based Freddie Mac said in a statement. It was the lowest in data going back to 1971. The average 15-year rate dropped to 2.73%, also a record, from 2.77%.

The housing market has been showing signs of recovering as low borrowing costs draw in buyers who are competing for a limited supply of homes. Mortgage rates declined after the Fed's Sept. 13 announcement that it would buy $40 billion of securities per month.

"We've already seen low mortgage rates even before the Fed action," said Anika Khan, a senior economist with Wells Fargo & Co. in Charlotte, North Carolina. "We'll continue to see mortgage rates come down. That means affordability will continue to be high."

Purchases of new U.S. homes fell 0.3% to a 373,000 annual pace in August, following a revised 374,000 rate in July that was the strongest since April 2010, figures from the Commerce Department showed yesterday. Home prices in 20 U.S. cities climbed more than forecast in July from a year earlier, according to an S&P/Case-Shiller report.

While borrowing costs are falling, they could be even lower. Since the Fed's announcement, the rates offered for new 30-year loans have fallen by 0.19%age point, compared with a drop of about 0.6%age point for yields on the bonds into which the loans get packaged, according to data compiled by Bloomberg and Bankrate.com.

The gap between the two, which typically signals increasing lender revenue when it widens, reached a record of more than 1.7 percentage point yesterday.

Copyright © 2012, Los Angeles Times

For more information, please contact Ashlie DuCros at 714-743-9778, or go to www.AshlieDuCros.com

 

4 Strong Reasons to Buy a Home Now

by Ashlie DuCros

4 Strong Reasons to buy a home Now!

“It’s hard to argue against buying a house now, assuming you can get a loan,” writes John Waggoner, a columnist with USA Today. Sure, Waggoner says that getting a credit check for approval of a mortgage can be a “only slightly less intrusive than a CIA background check,” but for those who are able to qualify, a lot of analysts say that now can be a good time to purchase a home.

1. The price is right. The median single-family home price hit its lowest in more than a decade when it reached $154,600 in January, according to the National Association of REALTORS®. That was the lowest since October 2001. During the height of the housing market in July 2006, the median home price for a single-family home was $230,900.

2. It’s cheaper to buy than rent. In nearly every major metro market, it is cheaper to buy a home than rent. Rents have been on the rise the last few years and are predicted to continue to rise. Meanwhile, home affordability is at record highs, which means that buying a home is more within reach to the median income family.

3. Inventories of for-sale homes are shrinking. Ned Davis Research estimates that excess inventories of homes to be eliminated by the end of next year. “When excess supply dries up, people start building more new houses, which has the virtuous effect of reducing the unemployment rate and increasing the economy generally,” according to the USA Today article.

4. Mortgage rates are at record lows. Mortgage rates have hovered near record lows for weeks, which has helped pushing housing affordability higher. For example, the average 30-year fixed-rate mortgage, which is the most popular among home buyers, is 3.59 percent, according to Freddie Mac—just above its record low set on July 26 of 3.49 percent average. “It’s conceivable that at some point in the next 30 years, your interest rate would be less than the rate of inflation,” writes Waggoner for USA Today.

Source: “If You Can Pull it Off, a House is a Smart Investment,” USA Today (Aug. 9, 2012)

For more information, please contact Ashlie DuCros at 714-743-9778, or go to www.AshlieDuCros.com

 

 

 

Mortgage Rates: The Record That Keeps on Breaking

by Ashlie DuCros

Mortgage Rates: The Record That Keeps on Breaking

The streak continues with average 30-year and 15-year fixed-rate mortgages taking yet another dip into record territory this week, according to Freddie Mac’s weekly mortgage market survey.

"With little signs of inflation and the Federal Reserve's ‘Operation Twist’ keeping U.S. Treasury bond yields in check, fixed mortgage rates are remaining low and helping to stir the housing market,” says Frank Nothaft, Freddie Mac’s chief economist.

According to Freddie Mac, fixed mortgage rates will likely remain at — or near — their all-time lows in the near future. The low rates will fuel “housing demand with a continued pick-up in housing starts, home sales, and even house prices in many markets,” according to Freddie Mac’s July U.S. Economic and Housing Market Outlook.

Here’s a closer look at mortgage rates for the week ending July 19:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged a new record low of 3.53 percent this week, with an average 0.7 point, dropping from last week’s previous record low of 3.56 percent. The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage has averaged below 4 percent for every week this year except for one. A year ago at this time, 30-year rates averaged 4.52 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged a new record low of 2.83 percent this week, with an average 0.6 point, down from last week’s previous all-time low of 2.86 percent. For eight consecutive weeks, 15-year mortgages have been below 3 percent. Last year at this time, 15-year mortgages averaged 3.66 percent.
  • 5-year adjustable-rate mortgages: averaged a new record as well this week at 2.69 percent, with an average 0.6 point, dropping from last week’s 2.74 percent average. Last year at this time, 5-year ARMs averaged 3.27 percent.
  • 1-year ARMs: averaged 2.69 percent, with an average 0.4 point, holding steady from last week’s average. A year ago, 1-year ARMs averaged 2.97 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

**Take advantage of these low rates now! Go to www.HotOCbuys.com to find your Home today!!**

 

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Ashlie DuCros & Associates
Coldwell Banker Previews Global Luxury
21580 Yorba Linda Blvd.
Yorba Linda CA 92887
714-743-9778
Fax: 714-849-5489